Best practice in risk management requires workplace and facilities professionals with responsibility for safeguarding their colleagues and the public to stay informed and up to date.

This advice and guidance aims to help you in that responsibility and to plan ahead as the pandemic unfolds.

In collaboration with industry experts, we have put together the following profession-specific and more general actions and measures that workplace and facilities managers should consider as essential and critical while COVID-19 related restrictions remain in place. This guidance does not provide complete technical information, but rather takes a pragmatic, professional approach and aims to support individuals with varying levels of responsibility and experience. With the situation around the COVID-19 pandemic evolving constantly, we will continue to monitor the latest advice and best practice guidelines, updating this page accordingly.

This page also incorporates specific advice and guidance for three different scenarios:

  • buildings remaining in full or partial use
  • closing buildings down
  • preparing buildings for re-use.

 

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Introduction

As workplaces, buildings and facilities of all types are temporarily closed or subject to occupancy restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, those responsible for managing and maintaining properties will still be required to: ensure statutory compliance; maintain essential building safety; protect systems, equipment and assets; and support staff still working in buildings exempt from the closure guidelines or working remotely.

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During this time of unprecedented disruption, the UK Government is not asking all businesses to shut – indeed, it says that it is important for business to carry on.

Business and commercial activity - including the provision of FM services, maintenance and essential repair work - should continue if it can be carried out in accordance with the guidance on social distancing issued by Public Health England (click here for details). Where it is not possible to follow the social distancing guidelines in full, you should consider whether that activity needs to continue and, if so, take all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission. Further official Government guidance can be found here.

Workplace and facilities management professionals, and their workers, often supply essential maintenance and management services, even when buildings are closed to other users. In collaboration with a range of stakeholders, IWFM has been articulating the need for these individuals and groups who perform critical functions in buildings, both open and closed, to be recognised as key workers and to clarify the confusion around which functions need to be maintained.

IWFM is aware that some within our profession who provide crucial services are struggling to carry them out in the current environment, sometimes due to confusion around who should be able to move around or enter buildings. The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) Regulations 2020 and associated guidance already allows for workers who cannot reasonably work from home to leave the house to travel to work. There is no requirement for these workers to carry any documents to prove they have a valid reason for travelling to work. Police officers, if questioning individuals on their purpose for travel, should be content with a verbal explanation. Police guidance, most recently updated on 31st March 2020, is publicly available to download here.


Information sources

Please choose your information sources carefully. Things are changing rapidly, so accuracy, reliability and staying up to date are essential. 

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The NHS, Public Health England and the UK Government are the obvious main sources, but other specialist organisations and professional bodies are also providing useful guidance and sharing experiences. 

Your supply chain and customers will also be key sources of information on how the situation is affecting them and what they are doing to maintain operations.

Perhaps inevitably, there will be spurious information in circulation, on social media in particular; you need to be able to correct misinformation and refer to official sources.

Many sources of reliable information are provided in the Resources section below.


Leadership

As the situation develops and challenges grow, clear and active leadership is essential to key decision-making and for reassuring staff.

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Some businesses have created a specialist team of subject matter experts to decide on policy and produce plans to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus. To help teams operate effectively over the indeterminate time that the pandemic may last, it is important that leadership is visible - for example, through regular communications - even if people are working remotely, and that plans are in place for deputies to step up if people become unavailable.


Communication

During challenging and uncertain times like these, having effective and trusted ways of communicating with staff and other stakeholders is essential to ensure that people are aware of the decisions you make and any actions they need to take.

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Clear, consistent and regular communication provides reassurance and will divert people from less reliable sources of information.

It is also important to use a variety of appropriate channels for your communication, such as: email updates; intranet/internet information pages with Q&As; video conferencing if possible; and, where appropriate, posters in buildings and public areas.

With many staff now working remotely and concerned about their own wellbeing and that of their families, it may be necessary to review and even step up communication and engagement approaches. Regular virtual team meetings and wider meetings with senior managers can be key to maintaining a sense of connectedness to the organisation and to a wider common experience. It also provides opportunities for staff to raise questions and share ideas and coping tactics. Ensuring that people can stay in touch and do not become uncharacteristically withdrawn is an important factor in maintaining positive morale and minimising stress levels.

It is difficult to predict how the COVID-19 pandemic will develop and how long it will run, but having effective and flexible arrangements to lead and communicate your response within your organisation will be essential to mitigating the impact.

It is also important to use a variety of appropriate channels for your communication, such as: email updates; intranet/internet information pages with Q&As; video conferencing if possible; and, if appropriate, posters in buildings and public areas.

With many staff now working remotely and concerned about their own wellbeing and that of their families, it may be necessary to review and even step up communication and engagement approaches. Regular virtual team meetings and wider meetings with senior managers can be key to maintaining a sense of connectedness to the organisation and to a wider common experience. It also provides opportunities for staff to raise questions and share ideas and coping tactics. Ensuring that people can stay in touch and do not become uncharacteristically withdrawn is an important factor in maintaining positive morale and minimising stress levels.


Business continuity plans

Organisations will be drawing on and developing existing business continuity plans, but the pandemic situation will create some unusual challenges and test the strength of current plans in some key places.

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Some things to review are:

  • supply chains tested to the full: are you in regular contact with key suppliers, do you understand their plans, and do you have an open and honest relationship where they will share the true position with you?
  • critical spares and essential supplies: have you assessed your current assets and ensured you have access to critical spares and essential supplies if supply chains are interrupted.
  • social distancing: Government measures and communications focus on the key aims of slowing the spread of the virus and reducing the peaks of illness and staff absence. Many businesses will continue to run a seamless operation with staff working from home. What more can you do to support this and help reduce face-to-face contact through virtual meetings, reduced travel, staggered shifts or allowing essential staff to commute outside peak times? Can you reduce the density of occupation in places like call centres by, for example, spreading people across different locations (such as recovery sites and other safe, remote locations)? Do you have the technology and connectivity to support remote working on an increased scale?
  • staff availability: do you have policies and procedures to deal with staff being taken ill at work, having long term caring responsibilities, staff who say they are concerned about travelling on public transport, etc? Assess what your critical services are and consider how they would be delivered during periods of significant staff sickness/absence levels.
  • operations: have you planned how you will operate if 20% or more of your workforce are not able to work due to illness or caring responsibilities?
  • staff contact details: do you have up-to-date contact details for your people and their next of kin? Do you have a good reporting mechanism to record staff absences, particularly cases of coronavirus? Can you track returns to work? The current information suggests that people do not catch the virus twice, so those returning will be a key and reliable resource
  • longevity: will your plans remain effective over weeks or months? What additional challenges will this bring? While initial plans will have been activated by now and things may appear stable in the current lockdown, now is a good time to consider how the situation may develop: if a longer period of lockdown or more stringent controls on movement and working are introduced by Government, will your current plans work and are they sustainable in the longer term?
  • supply chain: are you maintaining good links with your supply chain? How will they respond in the longer term? How vulnerable are they and what risks do they face? What if key suppliers cannot support you in a more protracted period of disruption – do you have a realistic plan to deal with this?


Commercial

Many more organisations are tuning into the value that excellent workplace and facilities management can bring to their business through performance enhancing workplace experiences.

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In others, it remains the case that facilities services are perceived as a fixed cost which can be driven down or eliminated altogether when a business is facing long running financial challenges. In either circumstance, however, it is clear that the ability to remove and reduce costs while there is a downturn in business may be a consideration in the current circumstances. These are ethical questions, as well as commercial ones.

The situation may disrupt supply arrangements and most contracts will have a Force Majeure clause, but its precise application will depend on the contract. If you are a supplier, demonstrating that you have done all you reasonably can to mitigate the impact of the pandemic will carry weight and you should expect the same in turn from your suppliers.

It is also worth noting that sometimes, in times of crisis, positive change can happen, such as exploring the benefits of remote working as a long-term workplace solution. Ultimately, however, the greatest priority remains the health and safety of everyone affected by this pandemic.


Fire safety

The National Fire Chiefs Council (NFCC) has produced advice to enable Fire and Rescue Services (FRS) to provide authoritative and uniform guidance to businesses across the country during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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It includes general principles, such as the need to maintain fire safety systems, as well as FAQs for businesses responding to enquiries received by an FRS.

The NFCC advice explicitly recognises that those working on vital fire safety, such as the installation and maintenance of fire safety measures, should be considered as 'key workers' because they are providing key public services and critical safety functions in order to keep premises safe. Members engaged in this critical function could use this as documentary evidence of their key worker status.

If you have any specific questions not covered by the advice, please contact your local FRS or primary authority in the first instance. If this is unsuccessful, you can email the NFCC team at: covid19.enquiries@nationalfirechiefs.org.uk

To see the NFCC advice, click here.


Security for buildings and premisies

Many buildings are closed or in partial use at present, which may prove attractive to criminals; meanwhile, it is also important for buildings and premises of all occupation levels to take extra care during the pandemic.

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  • carry out a risk assessment on controlling access to the building; if feasible, set up separate building entry and exit points with adequate security/monitoring; assess and mitigate pinch points; use automated doors where possible to prevent users touching surfaces
  • ensure appropriate health and safety procedures and protections are in place (for example, for lone working; key personnel/contractors who need building access, such as IT staff to perform checks/maintenance/repairs to communications equipment or server rooms)
  • maintain a visitor logbook with contact details in case contacts of a virus victim need to be traced
  • are any occupants (workers or residents) designated as ‘key workers’ and will therefore require full access and service provision?
  • check all exterior doors and accessible windows are locked correctly
  • check for signs of unusual activity/damage/vandalism around the building/perimeter; check outdoor spaces and outbuildings for unauthorised occupation
  • ground/close access to all vertical transportation units/cradles.


Cyber security

An increase in the number of phishing attacks has been reported with cyber criminals using the coronavirus outbreak to target people.

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Normal security processes may not work so effectively for staff working from home, so it may be necessary to raise the awareness of the threats. The UK National Cyber Security Centre has identified several recent attacks and provided guidance on homeworking and spotting scam emails.

The Internet of Things Security Foundation (IoTSF) also has cyber security advice for employers and home workers available here, in addition to free guides and checklists, including:

Any internet-connected system is potentially vulnerable to attack. A successful attack on a building management system could allow the perpetrator to not only take control of the BMS, but also breach the corporate IT networks they are connected to.

For a BMS with remote or corporate network access for operations or maintenance:

  • change any factory default credentials and ensure passwords are unique for each building or account. Enforce password policies (password history, minimum characters and complexity). Use two-factor authentication (2FA), such as an authentication app or SMS code, if you can
  • rename default and disable any unused accounts
  • check that the system is updated to the latest patch level/version as specified by the system vendor
  • if possible, offer authorised staff remote access to your BMS via a corporate network VPN, rather than connecting directly
  • ensure any staff or third-party contractors who are working from home with access to the BMS follow suitable security guidance, such as from the UK National Cyber Security Centre
  • ask your IT/cyber security function to monitor attempts to access your BMS system (both unsuccessful and successful) and agree how they can alert you to suspicious activity.


Buildings in full or partial use

This section provides advice and guidance for when buildings are in full or partial use, covering health and hygiene, utilities, fire safety, security, cyber security, and other considerations.

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Health and hygiene

  • follow the advice published by Government and other health authorities. To visit the main Government website on COVID-19 for businesses and employers, click here
  • provide sanitisers in all parts of buildings for which you are responsible
  • provide notices on frequent handwashing with soap/handwash for a minimum of 20 seconds; for example, near food areas and toilets, each time a person enters the building
  • enable social distancing through: remote working and use of video-conferencing; splitting teams and staggering working hours; eliminating hot desking; monitoring and discouraging presenteeism; separating work stations and using all available spaces; providing partitions between desks/workspaces; encouraging use of stairs rather than lifts (this will require sanitising handrails and providing sanitising stations at the top and bottom of stairs); where lifts must be used, lower their capacity to reduce congestion and contact at all times; and regularly clean touchpoints, such as doors and buttons.
  • screen any visitors by temperature checking and a quick health check
  • consider restrictions on visitors attending buildings: is the visit essential? Some organisations are requiring a Visitor Exception form to be completed in advance to seek authorisation for the visit from the H&S department
  • assess ongoing and future cleaning specifications and contingency plans, particularly if a building occupant or visitor has contracted the virus.

Air and water services, utilities, and fire safety

  • air-conditioning: if the system recirculates air, consider turning it off, check if the filters are adequate to retain/restrict the virus and take appropriate action
  • maintain optimal humidity of 40-60% as evidence suggests viruses survive better in low-humidity environments
  • maintain regular checks on: electrical systems (especially to fire safety equipment, security systems, emergency lighting and business critical services, such as server rooms); water systems and treatments (ensure boilers and pumps are functioning properly and at the correct levels, check for leaks in water systems and other products); all HVAC and environmental systems; the integrity of the building envelope; statutory gas checks
  • fire safety testing: maintain normal routines - employees who remain present must be competent to carry these out. Also see Fire Safety section above for NFCC advice. London Fire Brigade on prevention, protection and home fire safety can be found here.
  • liaise with service, testing and maintenance providers to ensure appropriate levels can be maintained due to their potential staff shortages; review building occupation levels and activities accordingly
  • plan for daily/weekly/monthly checklists (as appropriate) for all monitoring and testing activities in the event of a shutdown: will any remaining staff, for example security, be able to carry out any basic checks/functions such as toilet flushing?

Security and access

  • risk assess access to and within the building: is it feasible to set up separate building entry and exit points with adequate security/monitoring; are there pinch points; can more use be made of automated systems and doors to prevent users touching surfaces?
  • ensure appropriate health and safety procedures and protections are in place, including for lone working and key personnel/contractors who may need building access, such as IT staff performing checks/maintenance/repairs to communications equipment or server rooms
  • maintain a visitor logbook with contact details in case contacts of a virus victim need to be traced
  • are any occupants (workers or residents in mixed-use properties) designated as ‘key workers’ who therefore require greater protections/shielding, special access or different service provision?

Cyber security

  • normal security processes may not work as effectively for staff working from home, so it may be necessary to raise awareness of potential threats. The UK National Cyber Security Centre has provided guidance on homeworking and spotting scam emails, which can be found here
  • BMS and other Internet Connect Systems: IWFM’s Risk and Business Continuity Management SIG and the Internet of Things Security Foundation have produced guidance for FM professionals on how to mitigate potential additional security risks in relation to BMS and other internet connected systems in the current emergency; this can be found here.

Other considerations

  • carry out a risk assessment to identify wider risks which may result from potential changes in building operation or closure
  • workplace restaurants, cafés and canteens must be closed except:
    a) those in hospitals, care homes, schools, prisons, Armed Services establishments, or premises providing food or drink to the homeless
    b) where there is no practical alternative for staff at that workplace to obtain food construction: see the ‘Resources’ section below for a link to dedicated information on construction site canteens.
  • insurance: check whether the terms of your policies require you to notify your provider of any partial or potential full closure
  • mixed-use buildings: check on the welfare of any building residents, especially if they fall into the vulnerable category (those aged 70 or older, with an underlying health condition, or pregnant) or are self-isolating: do they have supplies of/access to food and any medical supplies?
  • liaise with all relevant stakeholders (such as owner/landlord/client, tenants, contractors) on planned procedures in the event of a partial/complete closure, ensuring relevant contact details are communicated
  • review and check emergency procedures and communications systems.

Resources

  • construction: the Government has confirmed that construction sites can continue to operate provided they adhere to Site Operating Procedures developed by the Construction Leadership Council. These procedures align with the latest guidance from Public Health England and include guidance on travel to sites, hygiene, canteens and cleaning. Click here to view.


Closing buildings down

This section provides advice and guidance for closing buildings down, covering health and hygiene, utilities, fire safety, security, cyber security, and other considerations.

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Health and hygiene

  • check the latest advice published by Government and other health authorities. To visit the main UK Government website on COVID-19 for businesses and employers, click here.
  • assess ongoing and future cleaning specifications and contingency plans, particularly if a building occupant or visitor has contracted the virus; what cleaning will be required before the building can be re-opened?

Air and water services, utilities, and fire safety

  • maintain optimal humidity of 40-60% as evidence suggests viruses survive better in low-humidity environments
  • adjust all mechanical set-points for nil occupancy levels
  • check electrical systems to fire safety equipment, security systems, emergency lighting and business critical services (for example, server rooms)
  • check that water systems, water treatments, boilers and pumps are functioning properly and at the correct levels. Check for leaks in water systems and other products
  • water flushing regime: flush showers, sinks and cisterns to prevent build-up of legionella. The Health and Safety Executive has published detailed guidance on the control of legionella bacteria in water systems
  • check all temperature, cooling, ventilation and environmental systems: ensure levels will not lead to equipment/asset degradation. Different settings are recommended for large and small buildings. If you would like further guidance, please email: policy@iwfm.org.uk
  • turn off all non-essential electrical equipment (for example, desktop monitors)
  • fire safety testing: if the premises are closed to everyone, tests and checks are realistically suspended; if essential management or technician visits are required, adopt a dynamic risk assessment approach (check the perimeter before entry, check fire panels for operation/fault, check MOE for obstruction and final exit, ensure there is a phone signal to dial 999). Further guidance from the London Fire Brigade on prevention, protection and home fire safety can be found here. Also see the ‘Fire safety’ section above
  • liaise with enforcing authorities and service, testing and maintenance providers to agree a schedule of what statutory testing and compliance activities can reasonably and safely be carried out
  • maintain daily/weekly/monthly checklists (as appropriate) for all monitoring and testing activities - can any remaining staff, such as security, carry out any basic checks/functions (for example, toilet flushing)?

Security and access

  • ensure appropriate health and safety procedures and protection are in place, including for lone working and key personnel/contractors who may need building access(for example, IT staff to perform checks/maintenance/repairs to communications equipment or server rooms)
  • mixed-use properties: are any occupants/residents designated as ‘key workers’ and therefore still require special access and protection? Do any occupants/residents fall into the vulnerable category (those aged 70 or older, have an underlying health condition, or are pregnant), or are any self-isolating: do they have supplies of/access to food and any medical supplies?
  • empty premises may present a more attractive target for crime: is your present level of security appropriate; are you using the most effective method of providing it?
  • check for signs of unusual activity/damage/vandalism around the building/perimeter, check outdoor spaces and outbuildings for unauthorised occupation (for example, rough sleepers, children). Check all exterior doors and accessible windows are correctly locked. Restrict/close access to all vertical transportation units/cradles
  • police crime prevention advice for empty commercial premises can be found here (your local Police Force may be able to provide additional guidance)
  • UK Policing and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure have published a protective security self-assessment checklist to help organisations understand their security assurance strengths and weaknesses during a pandemic; this can be found here.

Cyber security

  • normal security processes may not work as effectively for staff working from home, so it may be necessary to raise awareness of potential threats. The UK National Cyber Security Centre has provided guidance on homeworking and spotting scam emails, which can be found here
  • BMS and other Internet Connect Systems: IWFM’s Risk and Business Continuity Management SIG and the Internet of Things Security Foundation have produced guidance for FM professionals on how to mitigate potential additional security risks in relation to BMS and other internet connected systems in the current emergency; this can be found here.

Other considerations

  • discontinue all non-critical building and employee services, notifying third party suppliers
  • check for wind and weather damage to ensure the integrity of the building envelope
  • insurance: check whether the terms of your policies require you to notify your provider of building closure
  • ensure all relevant stakeholders, such as owner/landlord/client, tenants, contractors, have received all appropriate contact details
  • check emergency procedures and communications systems
  • make arrangements for post collection/distribution
  • pest control: ensure traps and bait levels are maintained, carry out inspections to prevent build up
  • ensure all food and drink stations, fridges, and so on, are cleared and emptied and that all waste materials are removed. Seek guidance from suppliers on actions to take with vending and drinks machines.

Resources

  • a services and security checklist for closed and unoccupied buildings can be found here
  • while not written for a situation such as the current pandemic, the IWFM Quick Start Guide on vacant property protection provides some additional useful information
  • the Construction Leadership Council have published ‘Advice on the temporary suspension of sites’ including guidance on planning, safety, security, environmental issues, and plant and equipment; to view click here.


Preparing buildings for re-use

This section provides advice and guidance for preparing buildings for re-use, covering health and hygiene, utilities, fire safety, security, cyber security, and other considerations.

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Health and hygiene

  • check the latest health guidance from Government and other authorities, for example on sanitising, handwashing and social distancing, and make appropriate provision
  • consider what measures implemented prior to/during the building shutdown would be good practice to maintain, for example a visitor logbook with contact details in case contacts of a future virus victim need to be traced
  • cleaning: assess what level is required prior to re-opening, particularly if any building occupant or visitor contracted the coronavirus; review future plans to help prevent any re-occurrence. Latest Government advice suggests that human coronaviruses can survive on inanimate objects and can remain viable for up to five days at temperatures of 22-25°C and relative humidity of 40-50% (which is typical of air-conditioned indoor environments).

Air and water services, utilities, and fire safety

  • carry out full checks on: fire safety systems: electrical systems (especially to fire safety equipment, security systems, emergency lighting and business critical services, such as server rooms); water systems and treatments (ensure boilers and pumps are functioning properly and at correct levels, check for leaks in water systems and other products); all HVAC and environmental systems (are they appropriate for dealing with any future virus outbreaks?); the integrity of the building envelope
  • re-set all mechanical set-points to appropriate occupancy levels
  • liaise with service, testing and maintenance providers to ensure appropriate provision levels can be restarted
  • fire safety: recommence testing routine at the earliest opportunity. Further guidance from the London Fire Brigade on prevention, protection and home fire safety can be found here. Also see the ‘Fire safety’ section above.

Security and access

  • maintain a visitor logbook with contact details in case contacts of a virus victim need to be traced
  • check for signs of damage/vandalism around the building/perimeter, check outdoor spaces and outbuildings for unauthorised occupation (for example, rough sleepers, children)
  • Police Crime Prevention advice for empty commercial premises can be found here (your local Police Force may be able to provide additional guidance)
  • UK Policing and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure have published a protective security self-assessment checklist to help organisations understand their security assurance strengths and weaknesses during a pandemic; this can be found here.

Cyber security

  • BMS and other Internet Connect Systems: IWFM’s Risk and Business Continuity Management SIG and the Internet of Things Security Foundation have produced guidance for FM professionals on how to mitigate potential additional security risks in relation to BMS and other internet connected systems in the current emergency; this can be found here.

Other considerations

  • insurance: if required notify your provider that the building is operational again
  • mixed-use properties: are any occupants/residents still designated as ‘key workers’ and continuing to require special access? Do any occupants/residents remain in the vulnerable category (those aged 70 or older, or with an underlying health condition, or pregnant), or are any self-isolating: do they have access to food and any medical supplies?
  • reinstate services with third party suppliers for waste services, food and drink services, post collection/distribution, and so on
  • pest control: check build up and traps, replenish bait levels
  • have all statutory checks been carried out that have become due during the period of closure (gas, lift systems, and so on)


Workplace, restaurants, cafes and canteens

All workplace restaurants, cafes and canteens must be closed except:

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  • those in hospitals, care homes, schools, prisons, Armed Services establishments, or premises providing food or drink to the homeless
  • where there is no practical alternative for staff at that workplace to obtain food.


Stress and wellbeing

Staff wellbeing covers all workplaces - it does not stop at the office door. In a culture where home working at scale remains the exception, it can be easy to regard our homes as an inherently relaxing environment.

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It is important to monitor stress levels and, where possible, intervene to provide alternatives to the shared spaces we previously used to share. 

Flat-mates and family members can be just as disruptive as busy, noisy workplaces, and many may feel the loss of familiar routines keenly. Mobile apps like Headspace can do much to promote awareness of mental wellbeing, as can guidance on how best to work from home.

Modern workplaces have different zones to allow for different types of working - quiet rooms for concentration, open venues for discussion. Can you encourage staff to vary their workplace according to task? For example, taking calls while walking in the garden, going for a re-energising jog at lunchtime, or switching off distractions, such as the radio, when focussing.

Organisations still have a basic Duty of Care for all their staff who are currently working from home. This includes Display Screen Equipment Regulations (DSE) assessments, remote working risk assessment, and so on.


Other IWFM guidance

We have a range of guidance notes and good practice guides available for members; the following have particular relevance to the present circumstances (downloadable and free of charge for IWFM members).

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01 May 2018

Risk management

This is a practical guide to help you manage risk within your role or organisation.

Find out more

01 April 2017

Agile working change management

Agile working describes a range of work arrangements that allow people and organisatio...

Find out more

01 September 2015

Business continuity

This guide explains the general principles and the practical application of Business C...

Find out more


Conclusions

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It is difficult to predict how this situation will develop and how long it will run, but having effective and flexible arrangements to lead and communicate your response within your organisation will be essential to mitigating the impact.

It is also worth noting that sometimes, in times of crisis, positive change can happen, such as exploring the benefits of remote working as a long-term workplace solution. Ultimately, however, the greatest priority remains the safety of everyone affected by this pandemic.


Resources

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Airmic: coronavirus resources for risk management and insurance

ASIS International: COVID-19 resources for security professionals

BSRIA: a webinar on 'Planned preventative maintenance during the COVID-19 pandemic'

BSRIA: a supplementary blog post about their webinar on 'Planned preventative maintenance during the COVID-19 pandemic'

BSRIA: a blog post on 'Continued maintenance of water systems is essential during building’s lower occupancy time'

Building Engineering Services Association: COVID-19 guidance and support

Business Continuity Institute: coronavirus organisational preparedness survey

Business Continuity Institute: COVID-19 resources and news for resilience professionals

Confederation of British Industry (CBI): coronavirus best practice for business

GOV UK: COVID-19 and cleaning of non-healthcare settings

GOV UK: full guidance on staying at home and away from others

GOV UK: businesses closed and exemptions to the list

GOV UK: Government actions and what to do if you have symptoms

GOV UK: guidance for businesses and other venues on social distancing measures

GOV UK: guidance for employees, employers and businesses

GOV UK: sector guidance for businesses on social distancing in the workplace

GOV UK (news): scientific evidence supporting the UK response

Health and Safety Executive: coronavirus information and advice

Health and Safety Executive: regulatory update

Institute of Directors: factsheet on resilience - the legal and practical issues of dealing with pandemics

National Fire Chiefs Council: advice to businesses and fire safety FAQs

NHS: an overview of COVID-19 with advice on staying at home

Public Health England: guidance for non-clinical organisations and health professionals

Public Health England: UK legislation which came into force on 26 March to supplement the Coronavirus Act 2020

Resilience First: guide for businesses when preparing for and recovering from major incidents


IWFM news articles

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03 July 2020

Apprenticeships and social mobility: new report shows the system is failing people from disadvantaged backgrounds

A study from the Social Mobility Commission, an independent advisory non-departmental ...

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01 July 2020

Recovering from COVID-19: Prime Minister announces strategy to return UK economy to health

On Tuesday 30 June, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave details of the Government’s i...

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30 June 2020

IWFM Impact Awards 2020: NEW category- the COVID-19 Response Award

The COVID-19 Response Award has been created, in association with Facilitate Magazine,...

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26 June 2020

What we learned from Marcus Child in ‘Leading for resilience and resourcefulness after COVID-19’

Episode nine of IWFM’s regular webinar series ‘Navigating turbulent times’ featured mu...

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04 June 2020

What we learned in our webinar: ‘Remote yet connected: wellbeing in the times of COVID-19’

Work is key to our wellbeing with a safe and pleasant working environment regarded as ...

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04 June 2020

Watch NTT episode eight: ‘Loosening the lockdown - spotlight on catering’

‘Navigating turbulent times’ (NTT) returned for its eighth episode on Wednesday 3 June...

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Your questions and comments

If you have questions on coronavirus which have not been answered in the official published information, please send them (together with any comments on how organisations should respond to the situation) to policy@iwfm.org.uk and we will do our best to answer them and publish updates.

With thanks to the IWFM Risk and Business Continuity Management SIG, Avison Young, the National Fire Chiefs Council, Robert Greenfield, Chair of the IWFM Health and Safety SIG, and IoT Security Foundation for their contributions to this web page.